Marketplace

Related Articles

More

Related Categories

More

Recently Added

More

Join StudyUp.com Today

It's always free and anyone can join!

Watch StudyUp Demo Video Now

You Recently Visited

Education Case Studies

Loretta Said:

need topics for an environmental education related case study...not global warming please something new?

We Answered:

1.) Palm Tree Cultivation in Malaysia and Indonesia- tool for successful economic development, and they now process it into biofuels for the European market, but it's had a detrimental impact on the environment and chimp population.
2.) Planting lugumous trees around fields in Africa to add more nitrogen to the soil and improve yields (See J. Saachs book, The End of Poverty)
3.) Compare and contrast composting education projects in various settings (Community gardens, universities, etc.)
4.) Alternative energy sources (wind and solar power- check out the new solar kites- there was an article on this a few months ago in the Economist)

Megan Said:

Can someone tell me a good education(teaching&students) case study topic?

We Answered:

Teaching children with special needs, such as Autism, or tourettes

Susan Said:

can i make an environmental education case study on gulf war?

We Answered:

Iraq & Kuwait – The Gulf War was fought between Iraq, Kuwait and a number of western countries in 1991. Kuwait had been part of Iraq in the past, but was liberated by British imperialism, as the Iraqi government described it. In August 1990, Iraqi forces claimed that the country was illegally extracting oil from Iraqi territory, and attacked. The United Nations attempted to liberate Kuwait. Starting January 1991, Operation Desert Storm began, with the purpose of destroying Iraqi air force and anti-aircraft facilities, and command and control facilities. The battle was fought in Iraq, Kuwait and the Saudi-Arabian border region. Both aerial and ground artillery was applied. Late January, Iraqi aircraft were flown to Iran, and Iraqi forces began to flee.

Fleeing Iraqi troops ignited Kuwaiti oil sources, releasing half a ton of air pollutants into the atmosphere. Environmental problems caused by the oil fires include smog formation and acid rain. Toxic fumes originating from the burning oil wells compromised human health, and threatened wildlife. A soot layer was deposited on the desert, covering plants, and thereby preventing them from breathing. Seawater was applied to extinguish the oil fires, resulting in increased salinity in areas close to oil wells. It took about nine months to extinguish the fires.

During the war, many dams and sewage water treatment plants were targeted and destroyed. A lack of possibilities for water treatment resulting from the attacks caused sewage to flow directly into the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Additionally, pollutants seeped from bombed chemical plants into the rivers. Drinking water extracted from the river was polluted, resulting in widespread disease. For example, cases of typhoid fever have increased tenfold since 1991.

Movement of heavy machinery such as tanks through the desert damaged the brittle surface, causing soil erosion. Sand was uncovered that formed gradually moving sand dunes. These dunes may one day cause problems for Kuwait City. Tanks fired Depleted Uranium (DU) missiles, which can puncture heavy artillery structures. DU is a heavy metal that causes kidney damage and is suspected to be teratogenic and carcinogenic. Post-Gulf War reports state an increase in birth defects for children born to veterans. The impact of Depleted Uranium could not be thoroughly investigated after the Gulf War, because Saddam Hussein refused to cooperate. Its true properties were revealed after the Kosovo War in 2001 (description below). DU has now been identified as a neurotoxin, and birth defects and cancers are attributed to other chemical and nerve agents. However, it is stated that DU oxides deposited in the lungs of veterans have not been thoroughly researched yet. It was later found that this may cause kidney and lung infections for highly exposed persons.




The Gulf War was one of the most environmentally devastating wars ever fought. Iraq dumped approximately one million tons of crude oil into the Persian Gulf, thereby causing the largest oil spill in history (see environmental disasters). Approximately 25,000 migratory birds were killed. The impact on marine life was not as severe as expected, because warm water sped up the natural breakdown of oil. Local prawn fisheries did experience problems after the war. Crude oil was also spilled into the desert, forming oil lakes covering 50 square kilometres. In due time the oil percolated into groundwater aquifers.

Marie Said:

where can i find studies,stats,surveys and/or case studies on convicts rehibilation with education?

We Answered:

There are tons of websites for this...I just happen to work in this area..Here is the state website for Oklahoma go to the links tab and look at the sites that they have.

Discuss It!