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Degree Completion Programs

Michelle Said:

Military Degree Completion Programs?

We Answered:

Yes, but--- requirements for entry can be different for the different branches.
You need to be talking to the various branches recruiters to get accurate information.

Lori Said:

Why havent i ever heard of the NAVY Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program (BDCP)?

We Answered:

One of the selling points to get enlisted recruits is by advertising GI Bill benefits for college. Among students who enlist for college benefits there is a dearth of knowledge regarding available financial resources to pay for college. Often times they are from working class families and their parents are not college graduates. There are plenty of community activitsts out spreading the word of available financial benefits in ethnic communities and the schools they attend but in largely white working class areas and in the schools they attend there is little interest on the part of the same activists to inform the students from the same or even much poorer socio-economic classes of available resources. The teachers and counselors in most schools are usually quite anti-military and completely uninformed of the benefits available to students who wish to become officers. To many, rotc is simply a dirty word from their college days. Something to protest against. The purpose of jrotc, which is to provide the first two years of the college rotc curriculum to high school students has been subverted by the anti military politics in most school districts. To survive, the program had to be promoted as a citizenship program and as an alternative to midnight basketball in the urban schools. In upper middle class schools, it is very rare to find a jrotc program at all. So jrotc has not been able to target the students who are best prepared to go to college and are prime officer material. It has largely become a source of enlisted recruits; maybe the name should be changed to jretc. Three years of jrotc however still is the equivalent of the college rotc basic course, but currently it is almost irrelevant since the ECP is only available at the nation's five military jc's: nmmi, vfmc, gmc, mmi, wentworth. Even if a student already has a sufficient jrotc background, he cannot enroll in the advanced course till Junior year except at the military jc's, and I think it has been like this for about 25 years. The anti military feeling of the 60's and the elimination of compulsory rotc at the land grant universities during the 60's at a time when jrotc was set to expand, also factors in, but telling that story would require a book. The end of the Draft in 1972 changed everything. The military would have to compete for enlisted recruits.
So, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding the benefits of afrotc, nrotc, nrotc mo and rotc among high school students which probably affects the quality of applicants to a certain extent, but the military doesn't want to launch a national campaign touting the educational benefits of programs like rotc because the lack of knowledge helps them to recruit an overall more talented class of enlisted soldier. As it is, nrotc and afrotc scholarships have become highly competitive. There might be a need to advertise nrotc on a specific campus and the Navy does in the student newspaper. Usually at the more selective universities that have an nrotc battalion; but overall, there is not a need to advertise in the mass media. Nrotc, nrtoc mo and rotc pay full tuition regardless of cost. afrotc has more demand and therefore can limit tuition. Nrotc as of this fall has reached a demand level whereby they have in essence increased the payback by adding a year to the active duty requirement from four to five years for navy option mids, but it remains at four years for marine option. BDCP is primarily for schools that do not have an nrotc battalion, and there are only 58 universities that do. Besides BDCP the Coast Guard has an even better program called CSPI however as of March 2009, it is now restricted to Hispanic serving, historically black and native american universities. But the hispanic serivng institutions actually covers quite a few universities, at least in California.
http://www.gocoastguard.com/find-your-fi…
The Coast Guard also offers direct commissions to graduates of usmma and the six state maritime academies: California, Great Lakes(Michigan), Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Texas:
http://www.gocoastguard.com/find-your-fi…
http://www.csum.edu/Military/MilitaryOpt…
http://www.mainemaritime.edu/
http://www.maritime.edu/
http://www.sunymaritime.edu/
The air force also has an equivalent program but I can't think of the name for it. The PLC is the Marines largest officer commissioning source but how many people have ever heard of it:
http://dcmarineofficer.com/platoonleader…
http://marineofficer.com/page/Officer-Si…
The short answer is that the Navy feels it is meeting its officer recruiting goals without a mass media campaign.
http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/sanfrancisco/op…
The Army and Marines aren't meeting their officer recruiting goals, but a mass media campaign would come at a

Elizabeth Said:

What does "Degree Completion Program" mean?

We Answered:

Most of the time, a “degree completion program” means pretty much what you’d expect. It’s a way that you can finish a degree (usually an undergraduate or Bachelor’s degree) that you might have started in the past but for whatever reason didn’t get an opportunity to finish.

These programs typically don’t require that you have an Associate’s degree. That’s something normally awarded by junior colleges (and certain other institutions) that represents the idea that you’ve completed the first two years curriculum of a 4 year liberal arts program. But a lot of 4 year colleges and universities don’t award these degrees, so somebody might have only had a chance to just begin their studies - - or maybe even get to the point that they were almost done - - but for various reasons never got a chance to finish. The Associate’s degree is very helpful in certain situations. For example, in places like California, the three tiers of the higher education system (junior colleges, California State Universities, and the various campuses of the University of California) are loosely coupled in that there are articulation agreements that gives you a real advantage if you have an Associate’s degree and want to complete your education at a CSU or UC campus in terms of admissions priority.

The other important characteristic of the degree completion programs is that they’re pretty liberal in terms of accepting college credits from other schools that you’ve completed in the past. Also, they might provide “credit for life experience” where things like your work experience can often translate into credits towards your degree.

These kinds of programs are great for people who might have been in school once, but circumstances resulted in them not being able to get the degree they set out for.

Have a good time with it, and enjoy the learning!

Courtney Said:

I have heard of the Navy Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program. Anything like it for other branches?

We Answered:

The Coast Guard offers CSPI (pays for the last two years of a baccalaureate degree) but it's limited to those attending (or who will be attending) designated minority serving institutions.

Details here:

http://www.gocoastguard.com/find-your-ca…

Jacqueline Said:

Degree Completion Programs in California?

We Answered:

I'm not sure what you're asking.. in order to finish you're bachelor's degree, you have to go to a university, don't you? I assume that's still true.. so you can always apply to the local ones, or even go online. Good luck.

Dean Said:

Navy Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program?

We Answered:

Yes, you will be able to apply to BDCP regardless of the major. The only restriction that is caused by your major is how soon you can apply. As stated by the previous poster, if you have a technical degree you can apply to BDCP as early as your 2nd year in college, however if it is non-technical then you will have to wait until your 3rd. Also, make sure when you go to get information from your recruiter that you are talking to an officer recruiter. The Navy has recruiters for officer programs and then recruiters that just do the enlisted side of things. Best of luck to you in your endeavours.

Dale Said:

Are accelerated BA degree programs equally accepted?

We Answered:

Yes, they can be equally accepted. It depends on the school and their accredidation. Do some checking into the school itself. If I can remember the site I had for doing just this I'll post again later.

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